Meret
thisiseverydayracism:

Share your experiences of subtle, everyday racism
Subtle racism has been shown in studies to be far more taxing and damaging to the victim, compared to (non-physically violent) overt racism [APA, WebMD].
This blog is a safe space by, and for, people of color where they can share their experiences with everyday, subtle racism, or racial microaggressions. 
Our main goal is to help people of color feel supported and validated in dealing with this insidious form of racism. We know how incredibly frustrating it is to have people doubt our experiences, so please be assured that you will always be believed here. No exceptions. 
White people are welcome to follow and learn what subtle racism can look like and avoid doing it themselves, and stand up against it as allies. 
What is subtle racism and why it is important to talk about it 
Submit your experiences of subtle racism

thisiseverydayracism:

Share your experiences of subtle, everyday racism

Subtle racism has been shown in studies to be far more taxing and damaging to the victim, compared to (non-physically violent) overt racism [APAWebMD].

This blog is a safe space by, and for, people of color where they can share their experiences with everyday, subtle racism, or racial microaggressions. 

Our main goal is to help people of color feel supported and validated in dealing with this insidious form of racism. We know how incredibly frustrating it is to have people doubt our experiences, so please be assured that you will always be believed here. No exceptions. 

White people are welcome to follow and learn what subtle racism can look like and avoid doing it themselves, and stand up against it as allies. 

niklasnyman:

Darkness

niklasnyman:

Darkness

wocinsolidarity:

not-homophobic-but:

These tweets from @OfRedAndBlue are very important.

RIGHT!!!?!?? like we’re not playing a theoretical game here, we’re talking about people’s LIVES

oliviadurdles:

Gosh, look how he moves in the rope. Look how his muscles are constrained.

anglepoiselamp:

11 Nail Art Designs Inspired by Knit and Crochet
ultrafacts:

Source If you want more facts, follow Ultrafacts


They also tend to have worse handwriting because they try to write as fast as they think.

ultrafacts:

Source If you want more facts, follow Ultrafacts

They also tend to have worse handwriting because they try to write as fast as they think.

humancomputer:

If you need me I’ll be in the bath watching lava on my television

humancomputer:

If you need me I’ll be in the bath watching lava on my television

symbioticlifeform:

darrenpillowscriss:

pizza-supper:

paleosteno:

ultrafacts:

Source If you want more facts, follow Ultrafacts

Whoa, it works:


wait what


THIS IS REVOLUTIONARY

symbioticlifeform:

darrenpillowscriss:

pizza-supper:

paleosteno:

ultrafacts:

Source If you want more facts, follow Ultrafacts

Whoa, it works:

image

wait what

image

THIS IS REVOLUTIONARY

socimages:

A  new study suggests that employers consider a for-profit degree equivalent to no college at all. 
By Lisa Wade, PhD
Holding a college degree, it is widely assumed, improves the likelihood that a person will be successful in the labor market.  This maxim draws individuals into college across the class spectrum and aspiring students who are low-income or non-white may find themselves enrolled at a for-profit college.
For profit colleges have been getting slammed for their high prices, low bars, and atrocious graduation rates.  Now we have another reason to worry that these institutions are doing more harm than good.
Economist Rajeev Darolia and his colleagues sent out 8,914 fictitious resumes and waited to see if they received a response.  They were interested in whether attending a for-profit college actually enhanced job opportunities, as ads for such schools claim, so they varied the level of education on the resumes and whether the applicant attended a for-profit or community college.
It turns out that employers evaluate applicants who attended two-year community colleges and those who attended for-profit colleges about equally.  Community colleges, in other words, open just as many doors to possibility as for-profit ones.
Darolia and his colleagues then tested whether employers displayed a preference for applicants who went to for-profit colleges versus applicants with no college at all.  They didn’t. Employers treated people with high school diplomas and coursework at for-profit colleges equivalently.
Being economists, they staidly conclude that enrolling in a for-profit college is a bad investment.
H/t Gin and Tacos. Image borrowed from Salon.com.
Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the co-author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

socimages:

new study suggests that employers consider a for-profit degree equivalent to no college at all.

By Lisa Wade, PhD

Holding a college degree, it is widely assumed, improves the likelihood that a person will be successful in the labor market.  This maxim draws individuals into college across the class spectrum and aspiring students who are low-income or non-white may find themselves enrolled at a for-profit college.

For profit colleges have been getting slammed for their high prices, low bars, and atrocious graduation rates.  Now we have another reason to worry that these institutions are doing more harm than good.

Economist Rajeev Darolia and his colleagues sent out 8,914 fictitious resumes and waited to see if they received a response.  They were interested in whether attending a for-profit college actually enhanced job opportunities, as ads for such schools claim, so they varied the level of education on the resumes and whether the applicant attended a for-profit or community college.

It turns out that employers evaluate applicants who attended two-year community colleges and those who attended for-profit colleges about equally.  Community colleges, in other words, open just as many doors to possibility as for-profit ones.

Darolia and his colleagues then tested whether employers displayed a preference for applicants who went to for-profit colleges versus applicants with no college at all.  They didn’t. Employers treated people with high school diplomas and coursework at for-profit colleges equivalently.

Being economists, they staidly conclude that enrolling in a for-profit college is a bad investment.

H/t Gin and Tacos. Image borrowed from Salon.com.

Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the co-author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

fannygoldfish:

Someone´s happy that the snow finally came!